URL Pattern API - Web APIs | MDN (2022)

Experimental: This is an experimental technology
Check the Browser compatibility table carefully before using this in production.

The URL Pattern API defines a syntax that is used to create URL pattern matchers. These patterns can be matched against URLs or individual URL components. The URL Pattern API is used by the URLPattern interface.

Concepts and usage

The pattern syntax is based on the syntax from the path-to-regexp library. Patterns can contain:

  • Literal strings which will be matched exactly.
  • Wildcards (/posts/*) that match any character.
  • Named groups (/books/:id) which extract a part of the matched URL.
  • Non-capturing groups (/books{/old}?) which make parts of a pattern optional or be matched multiple times.
  • RegExp groups (/books/(\\d+)) which make arbitrarily complex regex matches with a few limitations.

You can find details about the syntax in the pattern syntax section below.

URL Pattern API interfaces

The URL Pattern API only has a single related interface:

  • URLPattern Experimental

Pattern syntax

The syntax for patterns is based on the path-to-regexp JavaScript library. This syntax is similar to the one used in Ruby on Rails, or JavaScript frameworks like Express or Next.js.

Fixed text and capture groups

Each pattern can contain a combination of fixed text and groups. The fixed text is a sequence of characters that is matched exactly. Groups match an arbitrary string based on matching rules. Each URL part has its own default rules that are explained below, but they can be overwritten.

// A pattern matching some fixed textconst pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/books' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.exec('https://example.com/books').pathname.groups); // {}
// A pattern matching with a named groupconst pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/books/:id' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.exec('https://example.com/books/123').pathname.groups); // { id: '123' }

Segment wildcard

By default, a group matching the pathname part of the URL will match all characters but the forward slash (/). In the hostname part, the group will match all characters except the dot (.). In all other parts, the group will match all characters. The segment wildcard is non-greedy, meaning that it will match the shortest possible string.

Regex matchers

Instead of using the default match rules for a group, you can use a regex for each group. This regex defines the matching rules for the group. Below is an example of a regex matcher on a named group that constrains the group to only match if it contains one or more digits:

const pattern = new URLPattern('/books/:id(\\d+)', 'https://example.com');console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/abc')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/')); // false

Regex matchers limitations

Some regex patterns do not work as you may expect:

  • Starts with ^ will only match if used at the start of the protocol portion of the URLPattern and is redundant if used.
    // with `^` in pathnameconst pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '(^b)' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/ba')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/xa')); // false
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    // with `^` in protocolconst pattern = new URLPattern({ protocol: '(^https?)' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/index.html')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('xhttps://example.com/index.html')); // false
    // without `^` in protocolconst pattern = new URLPattern({ protocol: '(https?)' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/index.html')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('xhttps://example.com/index.html')); // false
  • Ends with $ will only match if used at the end of the hash portion of the URLPattern and is redundant if used.
    // with `$` in pathnameconst pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '(path$)' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/path')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/other')); // false
    // with `$` in protocolconst pattern = new URLPattern({ hash: '(hash$)' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/#hash')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('xhttps://example.com/#otherhash')); // false
    // without `$` in protocolconst pattern = new URLPattern({ hash: '(hash)' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/#hash')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('xhttps://example.com/#otherhash')); // false
  • Lookaheads, and lookbehinds will never match any portion of the URLPattern.
    // lookaheadconst pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '(a(?=b))' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/ab')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/ax')); // false
    // negative-lookaheadconst pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '(a(?!b))' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/ab')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/ax')); // false
    // lookbehindconst pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '((?<=b)a)' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/ba')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/xa')); // false
    // negative-lookbehindconst pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '((?<!b)a)' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/ba')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/xa')); // false
  • Parentheses need to be escaped in range expressions within URLPattern even though they don't in RegExp.
    new URLPattern({ pathname: '([()])' }); // throwsnew URLPattern({ pathname: '([\\(\\)])' }); // oknew RegExp('[()]'); // oknew RegExp('[\\(\\)]'); // ok

Unnamed and named groups

Groups can either be named or unnamed. Named groups are specified by prefixing the group name with a colon (:). Regexp groups that are not prefixed by a colon and a name are unnamed. Unnamed groups are numerically indexed in the match result based on their order in the pattern.

// A named groupconst pattern = new URLPattern('/books/:id(\\d+)', 'https://example.com');console.log(pattern.exec('https://example.com/books/123').pathname.groups); // { id: '123' }
// An unnamed groupconst pattern = new URLPattern('/books/(\\d+)', 'https://example.com');console.log(pattern.exec('https://example.com/books/123').pathname.groups); // { '0': '123' }

Group modifiers

Groups can also have modifiers. These are specified after the group name (or after the regexp if there is one). There are three modifiers: ? to make the group optional, + to make the group repeat one or more times, and * to make the group repeat zero or more times.

// An optional groupconst pattern = new URLPattern('/books/:id?', 'https://example.com');console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123/456')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123/456/789')); // false
// A repeating group with a minimum of oneconst pattern = new URLPattern('/books/:id+', 'https://example.com');console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123/456')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123/456/789')); // true
// A repeating group with a minimum of zeroconst pattern = new URLPattern('/books/:id*', 'https://example.com');console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123/456')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123/456/789')); // true

Group delimiters

Patterns can also contain group delimiters. These are pieces of a pattern that are surrounded by curly braces ({}). These group delimiters are not captured in the match result like capturing groups, but can still have modifiers applied to them, just like groups. If group delimiters are not modified by a modifier, they are treated as if the items in them were just part of the parent pattern. Group delimiters may not contain other group delimiters, but may contain any other pattern items (capturing groups, regex, wildcard, or fixed text).

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// A group delimiter with a ? (optional) modifierconst pattern = new URLPattern('/book{s}?', 'https://example.com');console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/book')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.exec('https://example.com/books').pathname.groups); // {}
// A group delimiter without a modifierconst pattern = new URLPattern('/book{s}', 'https://example.com');console.log(pattern.pathname); // /booksconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/book')); // false
// A group delimiter containing a capturing groupconst pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/blog/:id(\\d+){-:title}?' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/blog/123-my-blog')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/blog/123')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/blog/my-blog')); // false

Automatic group prefixing in pathnames

In patterns that match against the pathname part of a URL, groups get an automatic slash (/) prefix added if the group definition is preceded by a slash (/). This is useful for groups with modifiers, as it allows for repeating groups to work as expected.

If you do not want automatic prefixing, you can disable it by surrounding the group with group delimiters ({}). Group delimiters do not have automatic prefixing behavior.

// A pattern with an optional group, preceded by a slashconst pattern = new URLPattern('/books/:id?', 'https://example.com');console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/')); // false
// A pattern with a repeating group, preceded by a slashconst pattern = new URLPattern('/books/:id+', 'https://example.com');console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123/456')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123/')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123/456/')); // false
// Segment prefixing does not occur outside of pathname patternsconst pattern = new URLPattern({ hash: '/books/:id?' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com#/books/123')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com#/books')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com#/books/')); // true
// Disabling segment prefixing for a group using a group delimiterconst pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/books/{:id}?' });console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/')); // true

Wildcard tokens

The wildcard token (*) is a shorthand for an unnamed capturing group that matches all characters zero or more times. You can place this anywhere in the pattern. The wildcard is greedy, meaning that it will match the longest possible string.

// A wildcard at the end of a patternconst pattern = new URLPattern('/books/*', 'https://example.com');console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/books/123/456')); // true
// A wildcard in the middle of a patternconst pattern = new URLPattern('/*.png', 'https://example.com');console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/image.png')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/image.png/123')); // falseconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/folder/image.png')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/.png')); // true

Pattern normalization

When a pattern is parsed it is automatically normalized to a canonical form. For example, unicode characters are percent encoded in the pathname property, punycode encoding is used in the hostname, default port numbers are elided, paths like /foo/./bar/ are collapsed to just /foo/bar, etc. In addition, there are some pattern representations that parse to the same underlying meaning, like foo and {foo}. Such cases are normalized to the simplest form. In this case {foo} gets changed to foo.

Examples

Filter on a specific URL component

The following example shows how a URLPattern filters a specific URL component. When the URLPattern() constructor is called with a structured object of component patterns any missing components default to the * wildcard value.

// Construct a URLPattern that matches a specific domain and its subdomains.// All other URL components default to the wildcard `*` pattern.const pattern = new URLPattern({ hostname: '{*.}?example.com',});console.log(pattern.hostname); // '{*.}?example.com'console.log(pattern.protocol); // '*'console.log(pattern.username); // '*'console.log(pattern.password); // '*'console.log(pattern.pathname); // '*'console.log(pattern.search); // '*'console.log(pattern.hash); // '*'console.log(pattern.test('https://example.com/foo/bar')); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test({ hostname: 'cdn.example.com' })); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test('custom-protocol://example.com/other/path?q=1')); // false// Prints `false` because the hostname component does not matchconsole.log(pattern.test('https://cdn-example.com/foo/bar'));

Construct a URLPattern from a full URL string

The following example shows how to construct a URLPattern from a full URL string with embedded patterns. For example, a : can be both the URL protocol suffix, like https:, and the beginning of a named pattern group, like :foo. It "just works" if there is no ambiguity between whether a character is part of the URL syntax or part of the pattern syntax.

// Construct a URLPattern that matches URLs to CDN servers loading jpg images.// URL components not explicitly specified, like search and hash here, result// in the empty string similar to the URL() constructor.const pattern = new URLPattern('https://cdn-*.example.com/*.jpg');console.log(pattern.protocol); // 'https'console.log(pattern.hostname); // 'cdn-*.example.com'console.log(pattern.pathname); // '/*.jpg'console.log(pattern.username); // ''console.log(pattern.password); // ''console.log(pattern.search); // ''console.log(pattern.hash); // ''// Prints `true`console.log( pattern.test("https://cdn-1234.example.com/product/assets/hero.jpg"));// Prints `false` because the search component does not matchconsole.log( pattern.test("https://cdn-1234.example.com/product/assets/hero.jpg?q=1"));
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Constructing a URLPattern with an ambiguous URL string

The following example shows how a URLPattern constructed from an ambiguous string will favor treating characters as part of the pattern syntax. In this case the : character could be the protocol component suffix or it could be the prefix for a named group in the pattern. The constructor chooses to treat this as part of the pattern and therefore determines this is a relative pathname pattern. Since there is no base URL the relative pathname cannot be resolved and it throws an error.

// Throws because this is interpreted as a single relative pathname pattern// with a ":foo" named group and there is no base URL.const pattern = new URLPattern('data:foo*');

Escaping characters to disambiguate URLPattern constructor strings

The following example shows how an ambiguous constructor string character can be escaped to be treated as a URL separator instead of a pattern character. Here : is escaped as \\:.

// Constructs a URLPattern treating the `:` as the protocol suffix.const pattern = new URLPattern('data\\:foo*');console.log(pattern.protocol); // 'data'console.log(pattern.pathname); // 'foo*'console.log(pattern.username); // ''console.log(pattern.password); // ''console.log(pattern.hostname); // ''console.log(pattern.port); // ''console.log(pattern.search); // ''console.log(pattern.hash); // ''console.log(pattern.test('data:foobar')); // true

Using base URLs for test() and exec()

The following example shows how test() and exec() can use base URLs.

const pattern = new URLPattern({ hostname: 'example.com', pathname: '/foo/*' });// Prints `true` as the hostname based in the dictionary `baseURL` property// matches.console.log(pattern.test({ pathname: '/foo/bar', baseURL: 'https://example.com/baz',}));// Prints `true` as the hostname in the second argument base URL matches.console.log(pattern.test('/foo/bar', 'https://example.com/baz'));// Throws because the second argument cannot be passed with a dictionary input.try { pattern.test({ pathname: '/foo/bar' }, 'https://example.com/baz');} catch (e) {}// The `exec()` method takes the same arguments as `test()`.const result = pattern.exec('/foo/bar', 'https://example.com/baz');console.log(result.pathname.input); // '/foo/bar'console.log(result.pathname.groups[0]); // 'bar'console.log(result.hostname.input); // 'example.com'

Using base URLs in the URLPattern constructor

The follow example shows how base URLs can also be used to construct the URLPattern. Note that the base URL in these cases is treated strictly as a URL and cannot contain any pattern syntax itself.

Also, since the base URL provides a value for every component the resulting URLPattern will also have a value for every component, even if it's the empty string. This means you do not get the "default to wildcard" behavior.

const pattern1 = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/foo/*', baseURL: 'https://example.com' });console.log(pattern1.protocol); // 'https'console.log(pattern1.hostname); // 'example.com'console.log(pattern1.pathname); // '/foo/*'console.log(pattern1.username); // ''console.log(pattern1.password); // ''console.log(pattern1.port); // ''console.log(pattern1.search); // ''console.log(pattern1.hash); // ''// Equivalent to pattern1const pattern2 = new URLPattern('/foo/*', 'https://example.com');// Throws because a relative constructor string must have a base URL to resolve// against.try { const pattern3 = new URLPattern('/foo/*');} catch (e) {}

Accessing matched group values

The following example shows how input values that match pattern groups can later be accessed from the exec() result object. Unnamed groups are assigned index numbers sequentially.

const pattern = new URLPattern({ hostname: '*.example.com' });const result = pattern.exec({ hostname: 'cdn.example.com' });console.log(result.hostname.groups[0]); // 'cdn'console.log(result.hostname.input); // 'cdn.example.com'console.log(result.inputs); // [{ hostname: 'cdn.example.com' }]

Accessing matched group values using custom names

The following example shows how groups can be given custom names which can be used to accessed the matched value in the result object.

// Construct a URLPattern using matching groups with custom names. These// names can then be later used to access the matched values in the result// object.const pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/:product/:user/:action' });const result = pattern.exec({ pathname: '/store/wanderview/view' });console.log(result.pathname.groups.product); // 'store'console.log(result.pathname.groups.user); // 'wanderview'console.log(result.pathname.groups.action); // 'view'console.log(result.pathname.input); // '/store/wanderview/view'console.log(result.inputs); // [{ pathname: '/store/wanderview/view' }]

Custom regular expression groups

The following example shows how a matching group can use a custom regular expression.

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const pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/(foo|bar)' });console.log(pattern.test({ pathname: '/foo' })); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test({ pathname: '/bar' })); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test({ pathname: '/baz' })); // falseconst result = pattern.exec({ pathname: '/foo' });console.log(result.pathname.groups[0]); // 'foo'

Named group with a custom regular expression

The following example shows how to use a custom regular expression with a named group.

const pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/:type(foo|bar)' });const result = pattern.exec({ pathname: '/foo' });console.log(result.pathname.groups.type); // 'foo'

Making matching groups optional

The following example shows how to make a matching group optional by placing a ? modifier after it. For the pathname component this also causes any preceding / character to be treated as an optional prefix to the group.

const pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/product/(index.html)?' });console.log(pattern.test({ pathname: '/product/index.html' })); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test({ pathname: '/product' })); // trueconst pattern2 = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/product/:action?' });console.log(pattern2.test({ pathname: '/product/view' })); // trueconsole.log(pattern2.test({ pathname: '/product' })); // true// Wildcards can be made optional as well. This may not seem to make sense// since they already match the empty string, but it also makes the prefix// `/` optional in a pathname pattern.const pattern3 = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/product/*?' });console.log(pattern3.test({ pathname: '/product/wanderview/view' })); // trueconsole.log(pattern3.test({ pathname: '/product' })); // trueconsole.log(pattern3.test({ pathname: '/product/' })); // true

Making matching groups repeated

The following example shows how a matching group can be made repeated by placing + modifier after it. In the pathname component this also treats the / prefix as special. It is repeated with the group.

const pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/product/:action+' });const result = pattern.exec({ pathname: '/product/do/some/thing/cool' });result.pathname.groups.action; // 'do/some/thing/cool'console.log(pattern.test({ pathname: '/product' })); // false

Making matching groups optional and repeated

The following example shows how to make a matching group that is both optional and repeated. Do this by placing a * modifier after the group. Again, the pathname component treats the / prefix as special. It both becomes optional and is also repeated with the group.

const pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/product/:action*' });const result = pattern.exec({ pathname: '/product/do/some/thing/cool' });console.log(result.pathname.groups.action); // 'do/some/thing/cool'console.log(pattern.test({ pathname: '/product' })); // true

Using a custom prefix or suffix for an optional or repeated modifier

The following example shows how curly braces can be used to denote a custom prefix and/or suffix to be operated on by a subsequent ?, *, or + modifier.

const pattern = new URLPattern({ hostname: '{:subdomain.}*example.com' });console.log(pattern.test({ hostname: 'example.com' })); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test({ hostname: 'foo.bar.example.com' })); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test({ hostname: '.example.com' })); // falseconst result = pattern.exec({ hostname: 'foo.bar.example.com' });console.log(result.hostname.groups.subdomain); // 'foo.bar'

Making text optional or repeated without a matching group

The following example shows how curly braces can be used to denote fixed text values as optional or repeated without using a matching group.

const pattern = new URLPattern({ pathname: '/product{/}?' });console.log(pattern.test({ pathname: '/product' })); // trueconsole.log(pattern.test({ pathname: '/product/' })); // trueconst result = pattern.exec({ pathname: '/product/' });console.log(result.pathname.groups); // {}

Using multiple components and features at once

The following example shows how many features can be combined across multiple URL components.

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const pattern = new URLPattern({ protocol: 'http{s}?', username: ':user?', password: ':pass?', hostname: '{:subdomain.}*example.com', pathname: '/product/:action*',});const result = pattern.exec( 'http://foo:bar@sub.example.com/product/view?q=12345',);console.log(result.username.groups.user); // 'foo'console.log(result.password.groups.pass); // 'bar'console.log(result.hostname.groups.subdomain); // 'sub'console.log(result.pathname.groups.action); // 'view'

Specifications

Specification
URLPattern API
# urlpattern

Browser compatibility

BCD tables only load in the browser

See also

  • A polyfill of URLPattern is available on GitHub
  • The pattern syntax used by URLPattern is similar to the syntax used by path-to-regexp

FAQs

What is a Web API URL? ›

The URL API is a component of the URL standard, which defines what constitutes a valid Uniform Resource Locator and the API that accesses and manipulates URLs.

What is a URL pattern? ›

A URL pattern is a set of ordered characters to which the Google Search Appliance matches actual URLs that the crawler discovers. You can specify URL patterns for which your index should include matching URLs and URL patterns for which your index should exclude matching URLs.

How do I create a Web API URL? ›

Example: public class ValuesController : ApiController { // GET /api/values public IEnumerable<string> Get() { // returns /api/values/123 string url = Url.

Can I use an URL as API? ›

A common requirement is to build an API with the HTTP or HTTPS URL of a back-end service, and an API gateway providing front-end access to the back-end URL. Having used the API Gateway service to create an API gateway, you can create an API deployment to access HTTP and HTTPS URLs.

What are the 4 main types of Web APIs? ›

Four types of web APIs

APIs are broadly accepted and used in web applications. There are four principal types of API commonly used in web-based applications: public, partner, private and composite.

What is API URL example? ›

API Server and Base URL. All API endpoints are relative to the base URL. For example, assuming the base URL of https://api.example.com/v1 , the /users endpoint refers to https://api.example.com/v1/users . In OpenAPI 3.0, you use the servers array to specify one or more base URLs for your API.

What are the 3 types of URL? ›

type: It specifies the type of the server in which the file is located. address: It specifies the address or location of the internet server. path: It specifies the location of the file on the internet server.

How do I find the URL pattern? ›

Match the given URL with the regular expression. In Java, this can be done by using Pattern.
...
  1. The URL must start with either http or https and.
  2. then it must contain www. and.
  3. then followed by subdomain of length (2, 256) and.
  4. last part contains top level domain like .com, . org etc.
11 Feb 2021

What is a RESTful URL pattern? ›

A RESTful web service request contains: An Endpoint URL. An application implementing a RESTful API will define one or more URL endpoints with a domain, port, path, and/or query string — for example, https://mydomain/user/123?format=json . The HTTP method.

What is API URL structure? ›

The API URL is structured as follows: {tenant url}/{base api url}/{business object name}({'business object unique key'})?$ {query parameter and value}

Is API same as URL? ›

A standard web API works the same way. The key difference between an ordinary URL and a URL that's part of a web API is that an ordinary URL sends back something pretty designed to look good in your browser, whereas a web API URL sends back something ugly designed to be useful to a computer.

Do all APIs have a URL? ›

No, you don't always need a URL. There are many APIs using URIs. All URLs are URIs but not all URIs are URLs. URL is necessary in context of HTTP.

What is difference between API and Web API? ›

Both APIs and web services are technologies that enable the transfer of data between separate software applications. API is an interface that exposes an application's data to outside software, whereas web applications are one type of API with stricter requirements.

Is a URL a REST API? ›

A REST API is accessed with an endpoint URL. The endpoint URL consists of a base URL, a resource path, and query parameters. The base URL is the internet host name for the REST API.

Is there a difference between REST API and Web API? ›

As Web APIs are lightweight architecture, they are designed for gadgets constrained to devices like smartphones. In contrast, REST APIs send and receive data over systems making it a complex architecture.

What are the 3 types of APIs and give examples for each? ›

There are also three common types of API architectures: REST, a collection of guidelines for lightweight, scalable web APIs. SOAP, a stricter protocol for more secure APIs. RPC, a protocol for invoking processes that can be written with XML (XML-RPC) or JSON (JSON-RPC).

What are the 4 most common REST API operations? ›

Review these five common RESTful API HTTP methods that developers need to know. Use this guide to understand the differences and uses for each of the methods.
  • HTTP resources vs. resource collections. ...
  • Method 1: POST. ...
  • Method 2: PUT. ...
  • Method 3: PATCH. ...
  • Method 4: GET. ...
  • Method 5: DELETE.
16 Jul 2021

How do I get an API URL? ›

Through the dataset URL: You can get the API endpoint by simply taking the dataset's UID and replacing it in this string: https://domain/resource/UID.extension *where the extension is the data format you's like to pull the data as.

What exactly API means? ›

API stands for Application Programming Interface. In the context of APIs, the word Application refers to any software with a distinct function. Interface can be thought of as a contract of service between two applications. This contract defines how the two communicate with each other using requests and responses.

What are the 5 main parts of a URL? ›

A URL consists of five parts: the scheme, subdomain, top-level domain, second-level domain, and subdirectory. Below is an illustration of the different parts of a URL. Let's break down this URL structure below.

What are the two 2 forms of URL? ›

URLs vary depending on the location of the document to which user will link. Basically, URLs fall into two categories; Absolute and relative URL. They are described below.

What is URL and types? ›

A URL (Uniform Resource Locator) is a unique identifier used to locate a resource on the Internet. It is also referred to as a web address. URLs consist of multiple parts -- including a protocol and domain name -- that tell a web browser how and where to retrieve a resource.

What is URL pattern in web XML? ›

Servlet-mapping has two child tags, url-pattern and servlet-name. url-pattern specifies the type of urls for which, the servlet given in servlet-name should be called. Be aware that, the container will use case-sensitive for string comparisons for servlet matching.

What is URL pattern in MVC? ›

URL patterns for routes in MVC Applications typically include {controller} and {action} placeholders. When a request is received, it is routed to the UrlRoutingModule object and then to the MvcHandler HTTP handler.

What is URL parsing? ›

URL Parsing. The URL parsing functions focus on splitting a URL string into its components, or on combining URL components into a URL string.

What are the 3 components of a RESTful API? ›

REST API methods and request structure

Any REST request includes four essential parts: an HTTP method, an endpoint, headers, and a body.

What is REST API vs SOAP? ›

REST APIs access a resource for data (a URI); SOAP APIs perform an operation. REST is an architecture that's more data-driven, while SOAP is a standardized protocol for transferring structured information that's more function-driven.

What is URL parameters in API? ›

API Query parameters can be defined as the optional key-value pairs that appear after the question mark in the URL. Basically, they are extensions of the URL that are utilized to help determine specific content or action based on the data being delivered. Query parameters are appended to the end of the URL, using a '?

How is an API structured? ›

In a typical REST API, a resource will have two URL patterns assigned to it. The first is the plural of the resource name, like /orders . The second is the plural of the resource name plus a unique identifier to specify a single resource, like /orders/<order_id> , where <order_id> is the unique identifier for an order.

Is a web browser an API? ›

Browser APIs are APIs that are built into the browser and provide native features that can also be used in a web app. These can also be called web APIs. With the use of web APIs, we can easily implement certain features with fewer lines of code, such as: making network requests.

Is JSON the same as API? ›

JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) API is an application programming interface designed for lightweight data interchange (text-based data exchange format) between two computer applications operating on the same hardware device or between different computers in different geographical areas.

Is a Web API a server? ›

A web API is an application programming interface for either a web server or a web browser.

What does API URL look like? ›

API URL. The API is accessed from the URL: http://www.domain.com/api/index.php.

Should I use HTTP or REST API? ›

Choose REST APIs if you need features such as API keys, per-client throttling, request validation, AWS WAF integration, or private API endpoints. Choose HTTP APIs if you don't need the features included with REST APIs. The following sections summarize core features that are available in REST APIs and HTTP APIs.

Which URLs used in REST API? ›

REST API URL and OAuth 2.0 Endpoints

For example, you have your company's server www.mycompany.com and a Hub service. You can configure Hub to be accessible by www.mycompany.com/hub or, let's say hub.mycompany.com . /api/rest/ is the context path for the REST API of your Hub service.

Why Web API is called REST? ›

A REST API (also known as RESTful API) is an application programming interface (API or web API) that conforms to the constraints of REST architectural style and allows for interaction with RESTful web services. REST stands for representational state transfer and was created by computer scientist Roy Fielding.

Why We Use Web API instead of MVC? ›

Asp.Net Web API VS Asp.Net MVC

Asp.Net MVC is used to create web applications that return both views and data but Asp.Net Web API is used to create full-blown HTTP services with an easy and simple way that returns only data, not view.

Which is better Web API or web service? ›

Web service is used for REST, SOAP, and XML-RPC for communication, while API is used for any style of communication. Web service supports only HTTP protocol, whereas API supports HTTP/HTTPS protocol. Web service supports XML, while API supports XML and JSON.

How do I find my API base URL? ›

The base URL is defined by schemes , host and basePath on the root level of the API specification. All API paths are relative to this base URL, for example, /users actually means <scheme>://<host>/<basePath>/users .
...
Valid hosts:
  1. api.example.com.
  2. example.com:8089.
  3. 93.184. 216.34.
  4. 93.184. 216.34:8089.

What is request URL in REST API? ›

A request URL consists of an HTTP method, a base URL, and a resource URI. The request header also includes parameters such as the content type and authorization information. Use the following format to construct a request URL: <HTTP method> http(s)://<host>:<port>/api/public/<resource URI>

Is REST API a URL? ›

A REST API is accessed with an endpoint URL. The endpoint URL consists of a base URL, a resource path, and query parameters. The base URL is the internet host name for the REST API. The resource path is the address to the API resource.

What is base URL example? ›

Base URL: The consistent part or the root of your website's address. For example, http://www.YourDomain.com. Relative URL: The remaining path given after the base URL. For example, /contact_us, /seo/blog/new_post.

What is base URL and endpoint URL? ›

baseUrl is an absolute URL prefix that is different for each instance of the service, or when the service is accessed via the API Gateway. The endpoint paths are relative paths that follow the documentation of the REST API. scheme is the transfer protocols used by the API.

What is difference between API and web API? ›

Both APIs and web services are technologies that enable the transfer of data between separate software applications. API is an interface that exposes an application's data to outside software, whereas web applications are one type of API with stricter requirements.

Is HTTP a web API? ›

Web API is an API as the name suggests, it can be accessed over the web using the HTTP protocol. It is a framework that helps you to create and develop HTTP based RESTFUL services. The web API can be developed by using different technologies such as java, ASP.NET, etc.

Is there a difference between REST API and web API? ›

As Web APIs are lightweight architecture, they are designed for gadgets constrained to devices like smartphones. In contrast, REST APIs send and receive data over systems making it a complex architecture.

What is Web API and types? ›

Web APIs are APIs that can be accessed using the HTTP protocol. The API defines endpoints, and valid request and response formats. Web APIs include the APIs used to communicate with the browser (see Mozilla's Web APIs and interfaces list). They may be services such as web notifications and web storage.

What are APIs used for? ›

API is the acronym for Application Programming Interface, which is a software intermediary that allows two applications to talk to each other. Each time you use an app like Facebook, send an instant message, or check the weather on your phone, you're using an API.

What is Web API and how it works? ›

Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) are constructs made available in programming languages to allow developers to create complex functionality more easily. They abstract more complex code away from you, providing some easier syntax to use in its place.

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